NEMA Specifications

Computer Display Standards

NEMA Specifications
The following information is drawn from the National Electrical Manufacturers Association Publication #250.

DESCRIPTIONS, APPLICATIONS AND FEATURES OF ENCLOSURES FOR NON-HAZARDOUS LOCATIONS
TYPE 4 ENCLOSURES
Type 4 enclosures are intended for indoor or outdoor use primarily to provide a degree of protection against windblown dust and rain, splashing water, and hose-directed water; and to be undamaged by the formation of ice on the enclosure. They are not intended to provide protection against conditions such as internal condensation or internal icing.

TYPE 4X ENCLOSURES
Type 4X enclosures are intended for indoor or outdoor use primarily to provide a degree of protection against corrosion, windblown dust and rain, splashing water, and hose-directed water; and to be undamaged by the formation of ice on the enclosure. they are not intended to provide protection against conditions such as internal condensation or internal icing.

TYPE 12 ENCLOSURES
Type 12 enclosures are intended for indoor use primarily to provide a degree of protection against circulating dust, falling dirt, and dripping non-corrosive liquids. They are not intended to provide protection against such conditions as internal condensation. COMPARISON BETWEEN NEMA ENCLOSURE TYPE NUMBERS AND IEC ENCLOSURE CLASSIFICATION DESIGNATIONS

TABLE A-1 CONVERSION OF NEMA TYPE NUMBERS TO IEC CLASSIFICATION DESIGNATIONS (CANNOT BE USED TO CONVERT IEC CLASSIFICATION DESIGNATIONS TO NEMA TYPE NUMBERS)
NEMA Enclosure
Type Number
IEC Enclosure
Type Number
4 and 4X IP65
12 and 12K IP52
NOTE: The above comparison is based on tests specified in IEC Publication 529.

The above information is provided for the convenience of our customers. Miller Technologies makes no claims as to the accuracy of this information.


Computer Display Standards

Various computer display standards or display modes have been used in the history of the personal computer. They are often a combination of display resolution (specified as the width and height in pixels), color depth (measured in bits), and refresh rate (expressed in hertz).

Until recently, most computer monitors had a 4:3 aspect ratio and some had 5:4. Recently, monitors with 16:9 and 16:10 aspect ratios have become available, leading to new widescreen formats. Productive uses for such monitors, i.e. besides widescreen movie viewing and computer game play, are the word processor display of two standard letter pages side by side, as well as CAD displays of large-size drawings and CAD application menus at the same time. The VESA industry organization has defined several standards related to power management and device identification. Ergonomic standards are set by the TCO.


Standards
  X Y 16:10 16:9 4:3 non-square
pixel
QUXGA-Wide 3820 2400 x      
WUXGA 1920 1200 x      
WSXGA+ 1680 1050 x      
WXGA+
 
 
WXGA
1440 900 x      
1280 854 x     3:2
1280 800 x      
1280 768 x     5:3
1080i/1080p 1920 1080   x    
720i/720p 1280 720   x    
QUXGA 3200 2400     x  
QXGA 2048 1536     x  
UXGA 1600 1200     x  
SXGA+ 1400 1050     x  
SXGA 1280 1024     x 5:4
XGA 1024 768     x  
SVGA 800 600     x  
VGA 640 480     x  
QVGA 320 240     x  
(listed most recent on top)
  • 16:10
    • QUXGA-Wide
      Widescreen Quad Ultra XGA: 3840 2400, with a 16:10 aspect ratio. Also known as WQUZGA. This resolution generally requires 2 DVI connections between the monitor and graphics card.
    • WUXGA
      Widescreen Ultra XGA: 1920 1200, with a 16:10 aspect ratio.
    • WSXGA+
      Widescreen Super XGA+: 1680 1050, with a 16:10 aspect ratio.
    • WXGA+
      Widescreen XGA+: 1440 900, with a 16:10 aspect ratio. WXGA+ can also refer to 1200 854, which is a 3:2 aspect ratio.
    • WXGA
      Widescreen XGA: can refer to 1440 900 or 1280 800, both with a 16:10 aspect ratio, or to 1280 768 with a 5:3 aspect ratio.
  • 16:9
    • 1080i/1080p
      HDTV resolutions that some monitors accept, they are 1920 1080 pixels with a 16:9 aspect ratio. The resolutions are used with interlaced (1080i) or progressively-scanned (1080p) video.
    • 720i/720p
      HDTV resolutions of 1280 720 and aspect ratio 16:9, either interlaced (720i) or progressively-scanned (720p). These resolutions work with many multisync SXGA displays, though the video will appear horizontally squeezed if the vertical range of the scan beam is not changed.
  • 4:3 (Displayed aspect ratio. Some standards utilize non-square pixels)
    • QUXGA
      Quad Ultra XGA: 3200 2400 pixels. This resolution generally requires 2 DVI connections between the monitor and graphics card.
    • QXGA
      Quad XGA, quad meaning four, so the display has four times the pixel amount of XGA, with 2048 1536 pixels. Also called Super Ultra XGA (SUXGA).
    • UXGA
      Ultra XGA, a de facto standard with a resolution of 1600 1200 with 32 bit pixels, true color.
    • SXGA+
      Super XGA+, 1400 1050.
    • SXGA
      Super XGA, a de facto standard with a resolution of 1280 1024 with 32 bit pixels, true color. This is an unusual resolution because the numbers work out for a 5:4 display rather than a 4:3 one, so many images appear wider on SXGA displays than most other resolutions. The resolution probably should have been 1280 960 (a popular standard resolution for Unix workstations).
    • XGA
      Extended Graphics Array is an IBM display standard introduced in 1990. XGA supports a resolution of 1024 768 pixels with a palette of 256 colors (8 bits per pixel), or 640 480 with high color (16 bits per pixel). XGA-2 added 1024 768 support for high color and higher refresh rates, improved performance, and supports 1360 1024 in 16 colors (4 bits per pixel).
    • SVGA
      Super VGA, a video display standard created by VESA for IBM PC compatible personal computers. The resolution is 800 600 4-bit pixels. Each pixel can therefore be one of 16 colors.
    • VGA
      Video Graphics Array is actually a set of different resolutions, but is most commonly used today to refer to 640 480 pixel displays with 16 colors (4 bits per pixel) and a 4:3 aspect ratio. Other display modes are also defined as VGA, such as 320 200 at 256 colors (8 bits per pixel) and a text mode with 720 400 pixels. VGA displays and adapters are generally capable of Mode X graphics. It is identical to MCGA.
      • MCGA
        Multicolor Graphics Array. What IBM called VGA.
      • 8514
        released about the same time as VGA. 8514/A cards had a maximum resolution of 1024 768 with 256 colors (8 bits per pixel), interlaced at 43.5 Hz.
    • QVGA
      Quarter VGA
    • EGA
      Enhanced Graphics Adapter, with a resolution of 640 350 pixels of 16 different colors (8 bits per pixel) selectable from a 64-color palette (10 bits per palette item).
    • CGA
      Color Graphics Adapter, developed in 1981, IBM's first color graphics card for IBM PCs. CGA can display 80 25 or 40 25 text in 16 colors (4 bits per pixel), 640 200 pixels graphics in 2 colors (1 bit per pixel) or 320 200 in 4 colors (2 bits per pixel) (IBM PC video modes 0-6).
    • Hercules
      a monochrome display with a resolution of 720 348, capable of sharp text and graphics. Very popular with the Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet, which was the PC's first killer app.
    • MDA
      Monochrome Display Adapter, the original standard on IBM PCs and IBM PC XTs. Supports text mode only at 720 350 pixels.